Your Baby Has To Be In A Car Seat

…We don’t have one officer. We can’t afford one. 

Now what?

Fruitport_MI

Enjoy!

 

Disabled pensioner, 67, Who Was Mugged, Meets the Kind Stranger That Raised $413,000 in Just Four Days to Buy Him a New Home

Originally posted on Kindness Blog:

Until a stranger’s act of kindness turned his fortunes around forever, Alan Barnes’s life had been a hard luck story.

Born disabled, he has suffered from sight and growth problems, never been able to work and his distinctive appearance attracts stares in the street.

When a mugger pushed him to the ground outside his home and broke his collar bone, the 67-year-old was determined to soldier on as he’s always done.

But local beautician Katie Cutler heard about the cowardly attack and set up anonline appealto raise £500 to help the unfortunate Mr Barnes.

As of today the appeal had hit £330,125!

Alan Barnes mugged Mr Barnes, who is very frail, just over 4ft tall and weighs around six stone, has been overwhelmed by the response from well-wishers across the globe.

The donations mean he can buy a house of his own for the first time and not count the pennies…

View original 203 more words

A Small Bouquet

A_Small_Bouquet

‘Tis better to buy a small bouquet 
And give to your friend this very day, 
Than a bushel of roses white and red 
To lay on his coffin after he’s dead.
                              —Irish Proverb

Enjoy!

original graphic credit: unknown

 

Senior ‘Wish of a Lifetime’

Memories, friendship, and life …and a whole lot of giving!

_Football_FriendsEnjoy.

This story originally appeared on NBC news.

WOL

This May Actually Be The Oldest Profession

Doctors_Lawyers_Teachers

All schools are now back in session. How about a shout-out to our valuable Educators worldwide who give themselves away everyday at work.

Enjoy.

 

original graphic: Thoughts For Teachers

The Winter Man – by Marj Kenny

Originally posted on Kindness Blog:

old man art

On a cold winter’s morning, an old man sat awkwardly against a wall at Sydney’s Circular Quay station. I glanced his way for a moment and walked on along with the throng of people caught up in the bustle of commuting.

On my way home that afternoon, I saw the same man in the same place. He was crumpled over, his head almost on the ground. Two ambulance attendants were crouched beside him. This time my step paused. He was old certainly and wore a nice suit and was clean-shaven. And he was in a very bad way.

Shame rocked me. How torturous for that sick, old man to have endured the coldness of the entire day, sitting on the hard, unforgiving ground. He probably reached out to passersby for help.

No-one stopped. No-one cared. Out of sight, out of mind.

A different season and I again came across an…

View original 257 more words